Find Survey Maps for Your Property

How to search for survey maps online and find your own property corners.

 

So you've decided to locate your property corners, and you're looking for a map to help find them! The type of map you need is called a survey map, and it's likely that at least one has been created showing your property lines. Survey maps show the legal boundaries of properties and other landmarks, and many such maps are free to access online. We've created these instructions to help you find survey maps related to your property.

 

We'll start our search using a tool called GIS (Graphic Information System). In Oregon, each county keeps an archive of recorded surveys. The data from these surveys is combined with other map data to create a county GIS. In Benton County, use the following link: Benton County GIS

NOTE: Each county has its own county surveyor and its own GIS. These instructions are for Benton County, Oregon. Many GIS websites are similar, but there may be differences where you live. For links to Online GIS applications  by county, click here.

 

 

Locating Survey Maps with Benton County GIS:

 

 

1. Select “Search Taxlots” from the pull down menu (see below)

 

Select “Search Taxlots” from the pull down menu

 

2. In the search field on the right side of the page, type your street number and street name. There is no need to add the word “street”, or “road”. If the search address is no a numbered street (e.g., 28th Street), you will need to add the direction (e.g., NW 28). Sometimes it is most affective to minimize the amount of information that you type into the search field. If the search results in “Results: 0”, try only entering your street number; no street name. The search will take longer, but you are almost sure to get results to match your property.)

Type your street number and street name.

3. The results of your search should look similar to the image below:

The results of your search should look something like this:

4. Choose the “Select” button on the top of the menu. A dialog box will open on the right side of the screen. Select “Draw Box”. Then draw a box using the left mouse key.

Draw a box using the left mouse key

5. Click the “Select” pull down menu (the down arrow) beside the word “Taxlots” to reveal a “Surveys” search option. Choose “Surveys” and click the “Go!” button.

Choose “Surveys” and click the “Go!” button.

6. The result you should expect is that a list of surveys will be displayed on the right side of the screen and the county map will automatically zoom out to shown the extent of all of the listed surveys. The subject property will still have the gold-colored box that you
drew, but it will be smaller and roughly in the center of your screen.

The result you should expect

7. You probably will want to zoom back in toward the subject property with the mouse wheel.

8. On the right side of the screen, above each survey listed, there are a series of buttons. Mouse over the buttons to reveal their function. The functions operate with respect to the survey of interest. From left to right the buttons function as:

  • Zoom to Survey

  • Remove from Selection

  • Highlight (This highlights the area covered by the survey on the GIS map.)

  • Buffer (It is probably best to leave this value set to 0.)

Above each survey listed, there are a series of buttons.

9. Selecting the “Name:” value which is shown in blue font, will open the survey in a separate window in your browser. From this window you can print or download the file.

From this window you can print or download the file.

Some helpful tips:

  • Generally surveys with a larger number were performed more recently than smaller numbers. For example, CS 2490 (shown above) was filed in 1953, while CS 9922 was filed in 2004. It's a good idea to look at all of the maps because one may have information that can help interpret another.

  • Start your search small; just selecting the box on the subject property. After doing the small area search, do another search including the neighboring properties. This is important because monuments may have been found and recorded on a map by a surveyor performing work on an adjacent property.

  • Many, many, many properties have been created and not monumented. Your property might be this way. This does not mean that you have no property corners, just that they haven't been physically marked yet by a surveyor.

 

For more help finding your property corners, call your county surveyor's office. (For Benton County Sureyor, call (541) 766-6819)

 

JD McGee can help with your research and survey needs at a reasonable rate. Contact us today to learn more!

 

For more on finding your property corners, try this: Finding Your Property Lines and Corners